Virtual Introductions Make You Memorable

Providing Virtual Introductions Make You Memorable.

Handshake, Virtual Introduction, Introduction, Meeting, Email, Communication, D. Boyer Consulting

Virtual Introductions are just as valuable as Face-to-Face meetings between two new potential business partners.

 

One of the capabilities LinkedIn (LI) provides is ‘virtual introductions’ between parties for business, a career promotion, or developing relationships for future business. Unfortunately, LI will only allow a limited number before charging the user for ‘additional’ introductions. To get around this – ask the person who is 1st connection to check the 2nd connection’s profile for a direct email address or phone number to share.

What about outside the LinkedIn platform? You can get some serious ‘pay-back’ points from others when you provide a virtual introduction – on a social media platform or in an email.  Here’s how to construct an email virtual introduction.

Open a new email and in the ‘TO’ field, put all the email addresses of the folks you are going to introduce. In the ‘CC’ field, put your email address. Everyone will see who was included and it is transparent.

In the subject line, note “Virtual Introduction: (First /Last Name #1), (First /Last Name #2), (First /Last Name #3), with the first and last names of all to be introduced folks. Start the correspondence off with an explanation of what the purpose of the email is for all.  “I wanted to introduce you to each other because I believe each of you have or offer services (or products) in your businesses that may be of benefit to each other. Do follow up with each other in an email, phone call, or face-to-face. I would love to find out how this works out later, too!”

Then describe what you know about the person you are introducing, and then suggest ideas on what that person could do for the others. You could essentially provide 2-3 folks introductions and reasons for all of them meeting individually or together.  For instance:

“Ms. B. is a well-known videographer just starting her business marketing. She has performed hobby videography for five years, but now is a professional. She has completed work for (name some businesses) and her portfolio can be found at (URL). She needs to get her message to more potential clients. You can assist her in contacting others about her services for their websites and advertising.  She is willing to provide a deep discount in exchange for references, referrals, and mention in your upcoming catalog for your event next month.”  Follow that paragraph introducing the next person in turn.

“Mr. X handles all the public relations for the ABC non-profit organization, and knows many people in the entertainment industry in the local area.  He is conducting an event for the charity next month and is seeking to save costs by asking for cash or services donations in exchange for mention in the event’s catalogue and advertising.  He may have an interest in using Ms. B’s videography services and offer some names of folks he knows who may need videography services in the near future.”

Then end each paragraph with a point of contact list: The person’s full name, business name, business address, business telephone #, email address, and best time to reach them.  Provide a call-to-action, task for completion, and a direction to move by each of the recipients of the message.

These types of introductions are productive after meeting one-on-one with a new business relationship to find ways to assist each other – even if participants are not going to purchase each other’s services personally.  The end result is personalities whom you introduced to each other benefit in many ways.  They see how you, as the referrer, feel about them and how important they are in the business community.  They have had a short description of what they do already put in front of the other person, so don’t need to waste time with a full explanation. They feel comfortable with each other once they finally do get together because they trust your judgment in the match. They know you would not have steered them to each other without knowing them personally.

Real-time introductions often don’t allow for time to think or there may be too many distractions in the environment.  Virtual introductions may be more valuable than face-to-face because the recipients can take a few moments to think about connections, determine how much they want to provide, and determine what they want from the other(s).

 

 

Dawn Boyer, Ph.D., owner of D. Boyer Consulting – provides resume writing, social media management and training, business development, human resources consulting, and print-on-demand author coaching and consulting. Reach her at: Dawn.Boyer@DBoyerConsulting.com or http://dboyerconsulting.com.

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Virtual Introductions Make You Memorable

Providing Virtual Introductions Make You Memorable.

Handshake, Virtual Introduction, Introduction, Meeting, Email, Communication, D. Boyer Consulting

Virtual Introductions are just as valuable as Face-to-Face meetings between two new potential business partners.

 

One of the capabilities LinkedIn (LI) provides is ‘virtual introductions’ between parties for business, a career promotion, or developing relationships for future business. Unfortunately, LI will only allow a limited number before charging the user for ‘additional’ introductions. To get around this – ask the person who is 1st connection to check the 2nd connection’s profile for a direct email address or phone number to share.

What about outside the LinkedIn platform? You can get some serious ‘pay-back’ points from others when you provide a virtual introduction – on a social media platform or in an email.  Here’s how to construct an email virtual introduction.

Open a new email and in the ‘TO’ field, put all the email addresses of the folks you are going to introduce. In the ‘CC’ field, put your email address. Everyone will see who was included and it is transparent.

In the subject line, note “Virtual Introduction: (First /Last Name #1), (First /Last Name #2), (First /Last Name #3), with the first and last names of all to be introduced folks. Start the correspondence off with an explanation of what the purpose of the email is for all.  “I wanted to introduce you to each other because I believe each of you have or offer services (or products) in your businesses that may be of benefit to each other. Do follow up with each other in an email, phone call, or face-to-face. I would love to find out how this works out later, too!”

Then describe what you know about the person you are introducing, and then suggest ideas on what that person could do for the others. You could essentially provide 2-3 folks introductions and reasons for all of them meeting individually or together.  For instance:

“Ms. B. is a well-known videographer just starting her business marketing. She has performed hobby videography for five years, but now is a professional. She has completed work for (name some businesses) and her portfolio can be found at (URL). She needs to get her message to more potential clients. You can assist her in contacting others about her services for their websites and advertising.  She is willing to provide a deep discount in exchange for references, referrals, and mention in your upcoming catalog for your event next month.”  Follow that paragraph introducing the next person in turn.

“Mr. X handles all the public relations for the ABC non-profit organization, and knows many people in the entertainment industry in the local area.  He is conducting an event for the charity next month and is seeking to save costs by asking for cash or services donations in exchange for mention in the event’s catalogue and advertising.  He may have an interest in using Ms. B’s videography services and offer some names of folks he knows who may need videography services in the near future.”

Then end each paragraph with a point of contact list: The person’s full name, business name, business address, business telephone #, email address, and best time to reach them.  Provide a call-to-action, task for completion, and a direction to move by each of the recipients of the message.

These types of introductions are productive after meeting one-on-one with a new business relationship to find ways to assist each other – even if participants are not going to purchase each other’s services personally.  The end result is personalities whom you introduced to each other benefit in many ways.  They see how you, as the referrer, feel about them and how important they are in the business community.  They have had a short description of what they do already put in front of the other person, so don’t need to waste time with a full explanation. They feel comfortable with each other once they finally do get together because they trust your judgment in the match. They know you would not have steered them to each other without knowing them personally.

Real-time introductions often don’t allow for time to think or there may be too many distractions in the environment.  Virtual introductions may be more valuable than face-to-face because the recipients can take a few moments to think about connections, determine how much they want to provide, and determine what they want from the other(s).

 

 

Dawn Boyer, Ph.D., owner of D. Boyer Consulting – provides resume writing, social media management and training, business development, human resources consulting, and print-on-demand author coaching and consulting. Reach her at: Dawn.Boyer@DBoyerConsulting.com or http://dboyerconsulting.com.

Be Sociable, Share!


Follow my podcasts

Available on iTunes and Podomatic:

Add to Google

addtomyyahoo4

The Best Host for Websites – Highly Recommended for Customer Service

InMotion Hosting Affiliate